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Sake has already gained international citizenship. Yet, not many own proper sake cups and flask at home. Sake drunk with a proper sake set tastes better – so let’s get the basics right.

First of all, sake used to be sold in a masu, a measuring wooden cup which holds approximately around 180ml. At restaurants in Japan today, you might get a glass inside a masu, and to symbolise the flow of wealth, the server might then pour until the sake overflows and spills into the masu.

Sake is also served in ceramic cups, known as ochoko or sakazuki. These are smaller than masu, used at various ceremonies and parties.

And finally, the proper term for a sake server is tokkuri (also ochoshi). While tokkuri comes in all shapes and sizes, it is typically round and long, with a narrow bottle neck. Popular styles include Bizen, Iga, Shigaraki, Imari, and Mino.

Traditionally, warm sake is served by placing a sake-filled tokkuri in hot water and the narrow neck is supposed to keep the sake warm.

Of all the tokkuri, masu and ochoko we have researched, we are quite taken by this beautiful design and amazing materials of sake sets produced by Miranda Style.

Nikko Cedar Masu Sake Cup - 2011 Tochigi Award Winner

Nikko Cedar Masu Sake Cup – 2011 Tochigi Award Winner

Sake set Nikko Cedar

Sake set Nikko Cedar

The masu and tokkuri are made of cedar from Nikko, Tochigi Prefecture, well known for the World Heritage Site of Nikko Toshogu Shrines and Temples. To think that you are drinking out of a masu made of cedar from such a sacred site and handmade by local craftsman, sake will taste absolutely more superb.

No wonder we were mesmerised by the beauty – Nikko Cedar Masu and Tokkuri was the winner of the 2011 Tochigi Good Design Award. Watch the video below and be amazed by the beauty and simplicity of the masu and tokkuri.

Now it’s your turn to find your own favourite type or brand of masu and tokkuri. Let us know if you have any and we’ll feature them in our upcoming online shop. Kansai! Watch Sake Lovers’ Dream Masu and Tokkuri.